Cultural Omnivore No. 8

A Weekly Listing for Cultural Omnivores

JA’TOVIA GARY, AN ECSTATIC EXPERIENCE
You can catch her phenomenal short film, An Ecstatic Experience, at The Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC. Her images of blackness and femininity are beautifully edited and comprised of archival footage and iconic imagery. Her mastery of cinematic forms disrupts the flawed and limited visual representations of blackness. Gary’s film is part of the ongoing exhibit: An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017.

Visit: https://whitney.org/WatchAndListen/52 and http://www.jatovia.com/ for more links to works.

 

MELANCOLÍA
Author: Roberto Carlos Garcia
Published:  Cervena Barva Press, 2016
51 pages
Buy Here

Description from publisher: “MELANCOLÍA explores the emotional and psychological landscape of today’s mad world. The poems wrestle with loss, despair, love, longing, the challenges of being a father and a husband, the search for identity, and the fight for one’s soul. While the collection is not without hope, it resists easy redemption and facile optimism.“

 

CUCUMBER (2015)
Writer: Russell T. Davies
Stars: Mbissine Thérèse Diop, Anne-Marie Jelinek, Robert Fontaine

This series is definitely binge-worthy. Only eight episodes of confusion, rage, and tragedy with a protagonist you think you hate but end up empathizing with.

 

CHECK MY MACHINE
Artist: Paul McCartney
Album: McCartney II
Lyrics: “I got a woman a long time ago
I had trouble
I want you to see what you can see

Check my machine
Check check check check check my machine
Check my machine”

The weirdest record from an unexpected source, though Paul had some weird moments in his overall discography.

 

 

A Portrait of the Artists As a Pair of Young Wastrals

We love these two artists and the fact that they shared a dramatic friendship.

Writer: Jeffrey Meyers
Standpoint, October 2017

Opening Paragraph: “In 1945 Lucian Freud asked Graham Sutherland to name the greatest living English painter and to Freud’s surprise he named Francis Bacon. Sutherland then introduced them and initiated a close but volatile friendship — based on similar temperaments, social life and art — that lasted for 30 years.”